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Headed to Houston – Part I

January 16, 2017 , In: Culture, Folklore, Inspiration
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I recently took a trip to Houston for my bill paying job, and while it was hot and we worked a lot, we had some time to explore a bit as well.  In fact, the first weekend we were in Houston, there happened to be a bead show down at the NRG Center, home to the new NRG stadium and the now unused Astrodome.

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I had fun picking out a bunch of beads.  Here’s what I got!

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We took walks most every day through a very nice neighborhood.  Along the way I spied some great yard art!

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But my favorite photos by far are the ones that show what the morning after must be like after a hard night in Houston!

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We also went to the Houston Museum of Fine Art and the delightful city of San Antonio while we were there – I’ll show you those experiences in my next post.  I want to end this post with something of an interesting story! 

While we were driving to San Antonio, we ran across this sign identifying a creek – you’ve seen those, I’m sure.  This one, however, really caught my eye, and I decided there had to be a story behind it – I mean, how could there not???

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I got my trusty phone out and googled Woman Hollering Creek.  The story goes this way (from Wikipedia):

“Alternatively known as Womans Hollow Creek,[1] the creek’s name is probably a loose translation of the Spanish La Llorona, or “The weeping woman”. According to legend, a woman who has recently given birth drowns her newborn in the river because the father of the child either does not want it, or leaves with a different woman. The woman then screams in anguish from drowning her child. After her death, her spirit then haunts the location of the drowning and wails in misery. The legend has many different variations and there have even been occasional sightings of the restless woman’s spirit. The legend also states that if you get too close to the water, the hollering woman will drag you in, hoping you are her child”

You can also find a book of short stories by the same name (on Amazon) by San Antonio writer Sandra Cisneros – the book is a reflection of the juxtaposition of her life growing up with American influences while coming from a Mexican family.  I have ordered the book!

I always find traveling interesting in so many ways – it opens you up to wonderful experiences, culture and art.  I hope you enjoyed this post today and I look forward to writing about my experiences at the Houston Museum of Fine Art and San Antonio in my next post!

 

Susan Kennedy

Susan Kennedy Susan, the owner of SueBeads, started making glass beads in 2005 because she loved lampworked beads so much, but wanted to make her own instead of buying them on ebay! She also makes enameled components and dabbles in polymer clay, but her first love is glass. She has attended jewelry-making classes at ArtBLISS and has taken classes from Barbara Lewis (torch fired enameling) in addition to several classes at the Pittsburgh Glass Center.
    • Kathy Lindemer
    • January 16, 2017
    Reply

    I loved seeing the yard art! I wonder where the tradition of having it comes from. I can’t wait to see what you highlight from San Antonio. I have been there, but not Houston.

    • Jason Moninger
    • January 16, 2017
    Reply

    Such a great time with you fancy face!

    • Laney Mead
    • January 22, 2017
    Reply

    creepy story….. love the yard art and the blue skies ☀

  1. Reply

    Just love the yard art!! And I think I am making my own Woman Hollering Creek sign for my backyard! Sad story behind it but love the sign.

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